Pages Menu
TwitterRssFacebook
Categories Menu

Articles

5 Ways Your Parking Lot Might be Holding Back the Redemptive Potential of Your Church

Posted by on Dec 12, 2017 in communications, strategy | 0 comments

5 Ways Your Parking Lot Might be Holding Back the Redemptive Potential of Your Church

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | MoreBelieve it or not, your parking lot could be the thing that is holding back the potential of your church. In fact, your church might not be living up to its total calling because of what is happening at the parking lot. We call this site unSeminary. Today, we’re diving into an issue we can guarantee that no seminary has talked about anywhere before: Your Parking Lot Might be Limiting the Redemptive Potential of Your Church! Cars have a profound impact on the manner in which we “do” church across the country. As the adoption of the car took off in the first half of last century, our approach to churches changed and morphed accordingly. The local parish gave way to the regional church which ended up paving the way for the entire mega-church movement, which became a fertile ground for the multisite movement. We would do well to understand the impact of cars and connecting our parking lots to our ministry because they are so connected to what we do. Here are a few ways that parking lots might be negatively impacting your ministry. A Full Parking Lot is Limiting Your Church Obviously, most church leaders are inside their buildings when their services start. Your people might know that you have a problem and you’re never around to see it. Full parking lots are a great sign because that implies lots of people are attending your church. However, if they are “too full” like a packed auditorium, it can actually turn people off. Most municipalities’ bylaws are inadequate to tackle the required parking spots per seat in the main auditorium. Lots of cities typically only require 1 spot for every 4 seats in your auditorium. (I know one city by us that only requires 1 for every 40!) My experience suggests that your church needs 1 spot for every 2 seats in your auditorium. Most legacy church buildings were not built with this much space and might get cramped every week. If your parking lot is more than 70% full as your services are starting, it’s time to start looking for better parking solutions. You want your guests to be able to find a spot easily. Four Tactics for Dealing with a Full Parking Lot: Street Parking // Diving into your municipalities parking bylaws might reveal that your area allows street parking on Sunday. In many regions, the rules pertaining to weekend street parking are different during the week. It’s worthwhile investing the time to figure out if this type of opportunity exists on the streets around your building. Cross Use Agreements // Look around your immediate neighbors and find someone who you could borrow spots from. Oftentimes, other businesses and organizations will be open to you using their empty parking spots. However it’s much better to approach them and talk about it rather than just starting to use it. Park Your Leaders Off Site // Those who volunteer and lead at your church should be encouraged (or even required) to park off your location. Cast vision with them around the idea of creating more space for visitors and ask them to do the extra walk. Shuttle Buses // Churches facing a more acute parking problem might...

read more

Mark Einersen offers Helpful Advice on Launching a Leadership Pipeline at Your Church

Posted by on Dec 7, 2017 in Developing a Leadership Pipeline, podcast | 0 comments

Mark Einersen offers Helpful Advice on Launching a Leadership Pipeline at Your Church

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | MoreThanks so much for stopping by for another episode of the unSeminary podcast. Today we’re talking with Mark Einersen, Operations Pastor of Relevant Church in Locust Grove, Georgia. Relevant was founded in 2010 and is in a suburb of the Atlanta community. When Relevant was first founded about 87-89% of their community did not attend church on a regular basis, and about 75% had no connection with a church at all. Relevant was founded with the mission to be a church that unchurched people would be drawn to. It is a booming, busy atmosphere, but also a place where people are authentic and really care about you. Mark is with us today to talk about expanding church leadership to reach the unchurched in your community. A leadership vacuum. // In the early years of a church’s life cycle, finding volunteers can feel a little like just getting warm bodies into a position, rather than identifying who is the best fit for a role. That might have worked initially, but as Relevant grew, so did their teams. At first, it was ok to have one person overseeing the teams, but as they multiplied with the church, Relevant needed to develop additional leaders. Develop a plan to develop leaders. // As church leaders when it comes to looking for potential leaders, we tend to default to the person with the best attitude or natural skill for leadership. However, sometimes a person is capable, but their heart isn’t in it. Or sometimes a potential leader is not gifted or trained in leadership. Mark explains that Relevant’s senior pastor does a great job of creating a leadership culture, but the church began to realize they didn’t have a good plan for multiplying leadership. As a result, Relevant began to address the levels of leadership as well as the skill involved in leadership. Over the horizon plan. // Churches are good at declaring a mission statement and core values, but many times this mission statement doesn’t fully address the unique and strategic vision God has for a church in a certain community. Realizing this, Relevant Church began to ask themselves questions around this idea. Think about whether you are articulating a vision that is truly unique to what God has called you to do in your community. What will you be doing in 5, 10, or 20 years from now? How will you paint a clear and compelling picture of that vision for people? The staff at Relevant took the time to think about where they wanted to be in 5 years. They then crafted an over the horizon plan to get to that vision. They considered what they needed to do in the next 90 days, next year and next 3 years to get there. If a church wants to multiply their influence, they have to multiply leadership. So this became Relevant’s yearlong focus: what leadership do we need? how do we get there? and, how do we define it? Very generic vision versus very specific vision. // A church’s general vision is ultimately to reach the lost. Narrowing that goal into a specific vision with clear next steps over a limited period of time makes it tangible in people’s minds and easier...

read more

Life-Giving Leadership: Leading Well During Ministry’s ‘Busy Season’

Posted by on Dec 5, 2017 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Life-Giving Leadership: Leading Well During Ministry’s ‘Busy Season’

We’re honored to have Tyler Reagin, President of Catalyst, guest posting for us today. We hope you enjoy this timely article! Each year, the holidays shepherd in the busiest season of ministry for church leaders. Pastors and church staff members tip the scale seeking to balance programming, new church visitors, and the call to serve those struggling this time of year. The multitude of items needing attention can make it difficult for many to pour into the role of leading a congregation while giving adequate attention to their families and selves. In my time as a pastor—and now working with many leaders around the world—I have found four themes that help shape my holiday priorities, despite the busy nature of the season. RestChristmas is the same date each year, yet it often sneaks up on us. And if we’re not careful, we can even allow the season to sneak past us while we’re caught up in activities, even good activities, that accompany the season. I’ve learned to be intentional about slowing down and being present in the midst of the Christmas hustle and bustle for the sake of my family and my team. For my family, this looks like constantly reminding myself of the “why” behind the “what.” Why are we traveling? Why are we decorating the house and hosting friends? Why are we shopping for gifts? Questioning the intentions of our activities force us to slow down and rest in the purpose of the season. For my team, resting in the holiday season looks like creating time and space for us to participate in life-giving activities together. Whether it be an office gift exchange, a potluck lunch, or a couple days of working from home, I want to creatively make way for my team to feel as if they can slow down and rest, even at their workplace. RememberWe can afford to rest because Christ empowers us to look back and remember that he has finished the work. Jesus’ eternity-shifting words on the cross, “it is finished”, put an end to our striving and searching for God. From his birth to his resurrection, let’s remember the work he did. When we focus on the implications of God giving us himself in the form of a child, we remember that this season is a time to recognize the gift of his son and the freedom we have in him. This act of remembering fuels our faith and joy in the midst of this holiday season. As a leader, I aim to intentionally invite my team to join me in the practice of remembering. It’s not enough to just create space to slow down. The resting must lead to remembering. ReceiveOnce we remember all that we have been given in the gift of God, we can then give to others with a heart that overflows with thankfulness. Giving is often at the center of many churches’ and leaders’ holiday agendas, but one thing I have learned is that we must receive from the Lord before we can give with gratitude. Like a father who takes pleasure in seeing his son enjoy gifts from him, so does God take pleasure in seeing us joyfully and humbly receive from him. This season, receive the abundance God has for us in Christ, such as His...

read more

Warren Bird Offers Compelling Reasons for Your Church to Launch a New Campus or Church Plant

Posted by on Nov 30, 2017 in multisite, podcast, strategy | 0 comments

Warren Bird Offers Compelling Reasons for Your Church to Launch a New Campus or Church Plant

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | MoreWelcome back to another episode of the unSeminary podcast. Today I’m happy to have Dr. Warren Bird back on the show. Warren is the Director of Research and Intellectual Capital with Leadership Network. Leadership Network has been working with North America’s most influential churches for over 30 years, helping leaders and teams move ideas from implementation to impact. In July 2017 Warren and Leadership Network released a study titled “Five New Reasons Why You DO Want to Launch that New Church or Campus”. All churches are wanting to reach more people with the gospel, but they’re not always sure what they should do. Should they launch a new campus, plant a new church, or grow their existing location? No one had done a study of these questions side by side to find out what had the greatest impact. So Leadership Network set out to answer those questions and more, surveying more than 1500 churches about everything from growth and discipleship to what kind of facilities they used. Today Warren is here to talk about some of the insights with us. More millennials. // So many churches are constantly asking what they can do to reach a younger generation, specifically young adults. One of the biggest reasons to start a new church or campus is to attract this group. It can take years to transition an existing church and create a culture that attracts the younger generation, but to quickly reach that group, plant a new campus or church. Dr. Bird’s Leadership Network study found that you can attract 62% more people if you start something new, rather than staying and transitioning an existing church or campus. This is because churches tend to send out a younger crew when launching a new campus or planting a new church, and whatever the age of the leadership is tends to attract that age and a few years younger. More outreach potential. // Another fascinating question the study asked churches is: what percentage of the congregation are inviting friends to “consider faith in Jesus Christ.” Research showed that people attending churches or campuses started in the last five years are 52% more likely to invite friends and family. In fact 80%-90% of growth comes from people inviting new people. These new entities are often more contemporary and are on the cutting edge of attracting new believers. More engagement. // 31% more people volunteer regularly in the first 5 years of a new church or campus than any other time in life of the church. Churches reported that when they started something new, the engagement actually went up significantly. Prevailing churches understand that you need to constantly look for more ways to get people involved and launching new campuses is a great way to do that. More growth. // In its first 5 years of life, a new church or multisite campus typically grows 170% faster than at any other time in the church’s life. How you start sets the pace for who you become. Take advantage of those early days when growth will be at its highest, and encourage older campuses to learn from the growth and strategy seen at your newest campuses. And pay particular attention to leadership development as you...

read more

Bryce Baldwin Explains an Innovative Approach to Community Outreach Meeting Practical Needs

Posted by on Nov 23, 2017 in podcast, strategy | 1 comment

Bryce Baldwin Explains an Innovative Approach to Community Outreach Meeting Practical Needs

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | MoreWelcome to another edition of the unSeminary podcast. I’m here today with Bryce Baldwin of Rome Alliance Church of Rome, NY. Rome Alliance was founded in 1915. Today you’ll find a mix of people there from birth to age 93. Bryce grew up in this church, later returning to lead it. Rome Alliance is about impacting your whole life with the gospel in relevant ways, not just your Sunday mornings. Today Bryce is here with us to chat about how to make an impact in your community by meeting practical needs. Rome Alliance Church has started something really innovative among churches: community job fairs. What does your community need? // When we talk about outreach, think of what your community needs and how you can offer help in that area. One of the basic rhythms in someone’s life is that they look for work. The Lord kept bringing the idea of a job fair to Bryce’s mind and so he figured out how the church could host one. Their first job fair was held in April 2015. He began simply by inviting people in his church who were employers or owned their own businesses to get involved. From there he went out in the community to talk to other businesses. Rome Alliance’s goal is to provide a platform in which they can reach out to and walk beside people as they look for work. Place points of contact throughout the event. // At each of the job fairs they host, the church makes sure to have people at every possible point of contact—from the parking lot, to the welcome and registration table, to the application tables. Blanketing the fairs with church volunteers allows the visitors to make connections with the church. People often visit the church because they’ve heard about it from friends who have visited the job fair or are familiar with the regular job fairs in the community. Serving consistently in this way has built a good rapport with the city of Rome and the people there. As Bryce notes, it all goes back to one relationship, one person at a time. In addition, churches are constantly looking for ways to invite their people to serve, and a job fair connecting to the community offers a whole new area of volunteer opportunities. Look for ways to branch out. // As the job fairs have grown, they branched into Rome Alliance starting a separate 501c3 as a non-religious organization, called Rome Community Job Fairs. This change of structure allows for different opportunities for grants and sponsorships. It also created a new staff position and Rome Alliance hired a member of the church to handle the administrative aspects of the job fairs. This staff person can then meet with local businesses for coffee and talk with them about the job fair while also sharing the gospel with them. One of the goals of the city of Rome is to have new businesses come in, and the church has now become a part of that, creating a business focused on helping others. Create opportunities to get the word out. // To make your job fair a success, you need to get the word out. This can be done by...

read more

5 Ways Churches That Want to Break the 1,000 Barrier Stay Personal & Relational

Posted by on Nov 21, 2017 in communications, strategy | 0 comments

5 Ways Churches That Want to Break the 1,000 Barrier Stay Personal & Relational

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | MoreThe only people who like big churches are pastors. One of the paradoxes that churches face as they grow beyond 1,000 in attendance is that they actually need to act more like a small church in some ways. The “competition” of large and growing churches is actually much smaller churches where people are “known” by others. Your church is going to need to find new ways to ensure people feel connected to your church if you are wanting to grow beyond the 1,000 barrier. People stick and stay at your church because they find community and care there. They find a sense of “home” and relationship. They may be attracted by the great teaching, fantastic kids programs, and amazing music; but they will only stay if they find relationships with real people to help them stay connected. Ultimately, they need to find friends who they recognize at the church. There are a number of ways your church can work in, in order to ensure people perceive your church as relationally connecting people. You need to be seen as a warm and caring community long before people will find an actual community. (This is true of all churches regardless of their size.) On the journey of growing your church to this size, you probably went through a phase where you needed to “play bigger” … do things that larger churches do in order to instill confidence in people to invite their friends. Ironically, as you grow, you actually need to dial back some of those things because your size can work against you reaching people. If people perceive that you’re just obsessed with being bigger they will be turned off. Here are 5 ways to ensure your church is staying personal and relational as you grow: Avoid generic@ Email Addresses Stop using those generic email inbox accounts. Let people know that there are real live people who answer the emails at your churches, and you’re not a faceless organization. When you use those generic email addresses you are subtly communicating to your people that your team is untouchable and unreachable. The sorts of addresses we’re talking about are: info@ office@ hello@ team@ Managing email is a lot of work, yes. Often leaders are overwhelmed by how many inbound emails they receive. The “generic” email account is an attempt to stem that tide and deal with requests by a group of people. Rather than doing that, have a team manage your leader’s email inboxes. People from your church will understand when they email a team member of your church and that email is passed onto another person who helps solve their problem. When done well, that contact makes your people feel special—not ignored or treated like a number. Pick up the Phone! How do you feel when you call a business or organization and you hear the call automatically routed over to voicemail? What happens inside of you when you need to “push 1 for customer service … push 2 for support …”? A “simple” way your church can stay relationally connected is to have a real, live person pick up the phone and answer it. It’s not as “efficient” as just making people route their own calls through the...

read more

Greg Curtis Offers Next Level Assimilation Insights For Your Church

Posted by on Nov 16, 2017 in podcast, strategy | 0 comments

Greg Curtis Offers Next Level Assimilation Insights For Your Church

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | MoreThanks so much for joining us for another episode of the unSeminary podcast. Today I have Greg Curtis with me, director of assimilation at Eastside Christian Church. Eastside Christian Church was founded in 1962 and was recently named the second fastest growing church in the country with four locations in California and Minnesota. The problem that most churches experience is not necessarily getting first time guests, but rather getting those guests to stay, and that is Greg’s area of expertise at Eastside. He’s here with us today to talk about the scalable assimilation strategy Eastside transitioned to since the last time we had him on the show. See what isn’t working. // One of the first programs Eastside used was called First Step With Gene, where those new to the church could have pizza with Senior Pastor Gene Appel. Each year they had an average of 1200 people attend. During this program people heard Gene’s story and the church’s story. At the end, they learned about a seven-week program which everyone was pointed to. It was a kind of discipleship launch into small groups. This worked extremely well, but the problem was that they only did this program quarterly. There were so many new people coming through the doors, this system couldn’t support the growth, especially since Gene couldn’t be everywhere at once. Ultimately this lead to people waiting too long to attend the seven-week program at all and they never quite got plugged into the church. The Four P’s. // Greg has worked with churches across the world and seen their assimilation process. From there he worked to develop a scalable system for assimilation that could be applied anywhere, regardless of church size and location. This lead to what he calls the Four Ps: one place, one program, two processes, two placements. This can be done in a myriad of forms. The idea is to send your guests to one place, maybe using an incentive such as giving them a free gift. At that one place, invite them to your one program, whatever it is, whenever it is. That one program is then engaging them into two processes, a volunteer placement process and a small group placement process. Develop a program that works for your community. // Gene was exposed to Chris Hodges and his four week Growth Track program at Church of the Highlands. It’s ongoing and someone can jump in anytime or leave anytime. Eastside took this idea of providing an experience, rather than a class, and turned that into their Next Steps program. There are four steps and each step runs a different week of the month, but newcomers can start anytime and finish anytime, or attend the weeks out of order. The first step is Connect, featuring Gene on three short videos. Here people are encouraged to connect with Gene’s story, Eastside’s story and discover how pursuing God can impact their stories as well. Step two is Community where people enjoy some fun activities and discover how to build community by making friends, following Jesus and making a difference in a small group. Step three is Change Makers, where people discover how they are uniquely shaped to impact others. Week four is Compassion where...

read more

6 Dirty Secrets about Multisite Churches That (Almost) No-one is Talking About

Posted by on Nov 14, 2017 in communications, multisite, strategy | 1 comment

6 Dirty Secrets about Multisite Churches That (Almost) No-one is Talking About

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | MoreIs your church considering going multisite? It would seem like every church leader I talk with is wrestling with this approach on reaching new communities. Studies have shown that basically every growing church is either already multisite or actively looking into it. I’ve been a practitioner of this approach to church since the early 2000s. I can still remember having conversations with Greg Ligon from the Leadership Network many years ago and him telling me about nearly a dozen other churches that were doing something like what we were doing at The Meeting House – launching this dispersed approach to church. At that time, it seemed crazy to me that there were that many other churches trying out this approach; little did I know that in just over a decade, the multisite revolution would jump to 1,000 churches and impact the lives of millions of people. As an unabashed fan of this approach to reaching more people, I do have a confession to make. There are aspects of being a multisite church that aren’t as great on the inside as they look on the outside. There are some dirty secrets within this movement that I want you to be fully aware of if you are considering launching a new campus. Or maybe you already have a few campuses and something just doesn’t feel right. 85% of Multisite Churches Aren’t Launching More Than 2 Locations. Leadership Network has been at the heart of fueling this movement. They’ve done a number of great studies and books that have been cornerstone to this movement’s development. In fact, in a lot of ways, they deserve the credit for helping codify how this movement understands and talks about itself … a critical aspect of disseminating ideas. They’ve done a number of landmark studies into the dynamics of this movement that you should check out. In their most recent study, it was found that 85% of multisite churches don’t get 2 locations beyond their original location. The vast majority of multisite churches simply aren’t moving beyond 3 locations in totality. Why? It could be that the movement is still too young and this number is likely to rise over time. It could be that there is something built into the complexity of 4+ locations that is slowing down the churches’ abilities to go there. Having talked with dozens and dozens of multisite church leaders over the years, I’m convinced about the problem: most multisite churches launch campuses as opposed to launching a system for launching campuses. They think about how they extend themselves into a location or two, but don’t put enough creative thought into building a culture and approach that gets the church into the rhythm of launching regularly. I had the honor of being a part of The Meeting House as this fantastic church launched its first 6 locations. After launching out the first location we set the audacious goal of launching one campus every year for 5 years! We had no idea what we were doing when we set that target, but it did impel us to think about building a system for sustainable launches rather than a single location. All these years later, this church has 19 locations and is...

read more

Marty Sawyers Helps You Improve The Communication Culture in Your Church

Posted by on Nov 9, 2017 in communications, podcast | 0 comments

Marty Sawyers Helps You Improve The Communication Culture in Your Church

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | MoreWelcome and thanks for joining us for this episode of the unSeminary podcast. I’m thrilled to have Marty Sawyers with us today. Marty is the executive pastor at Cornerstone Christian Fellowship in Arizona. Cornerstone Christian Fellowship is one of the fastest growing churches in the country. It has a lot of activities for the family with a very practical, biblical message. As the Executive Pastor, Marty oversees all staff and is part of the executive team which oversees every part of the church. Communication breakdowns are a fairly common challenge in all types of interpersonal relationships, including ministry, and can be linked back to causing most problems. Marty is talking with us today about how Cornerstone has tackled the challenge of improving the communication culture among its staff. Find the problems. // The first evidence that the communication culture needed work among the staff at Cornerstone was a general sense that something wasn’t right. Marty says they did the Best Christian Workplace Survey, which is a standard 55 questions regarding the workplace, plus Cornerstone could add a few extra questions specific to them. The survey revealed some consistent themes that needed to be addressed. The biggest issue was that the staff just wasn’t talking with each other very well, both up and down, top to bottom, and side to side. Examine the problem. // Not everyone may realize there is a communication issue, but if some people on the staff are saying it, it should be looked at closely. Approach it ready to listen and admit, “We have a problem, so let’s talk about it.” At Cornerstone, everyone was sent off in their divisions and asked a series of questions. The executive team wanted to know what people thought it would look like to have a healthy culture of communication from top down, between ministries, and on their own team. They also asked about some specific examples of the existing issues. After compiling the data and looking for trends, they developed a couple of focus groups among the staff. Include everyone in the solution. // It can be difficult to get honest because no one wants to put themselves out there. As a result, no one on the executive team led the focus groups. An outside HR consultant was brought in, which provided a feeling of security and comfort. Staff were able to open up and share things they might not have said to Marty or other staff members. Marty knew as people felt safer being honest, it would contribute to a better communication culture – one where the staff understood the executive team really wanted to listen to them. As Cornerstone began implementing strategies to address the existing issues, Marty emphasized how important it is that the staff be a part of the solution. Everyone needed to own the steps the church as a whole was taking to improve the culture. Communication reminders. // Very practically speaking, when a decision or change is made, Cornerstone now makes sure everyone who needs to hear about it does. Sometimes it’s just a matter of casting vision and helping people understand why a decision was made rather than just sharing what the decision was. The staff wants to get on board with these decisions...

read more

The 1 Tactic Your Church Needs to Do to Boost Year End Giving

Posted by on Nov 7, 2017 in communications | 4 comments

The 1 Tactic Your Church Needs to Do to Boost Year End Giving

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | MoreWe are just heading into the largest giving period of the year for charities across the country. In fact, 30% of all charitable giving will be done during the month of December. [ref] Many nonprofits have been working, for months, on the plans for these last 31 days of the year. Their strategies and tactics have become almost stereotypical; you can see the marketing machines turn up the pressure to encourage people fund their causes: The “gift” catalogue where you can purchase a goat and somehow send it to a kid in a developing country. Social media barrages of heart warming stories delivered with an elegant ask to fund the mission. Multiple direct mail pieces landing at the perfect time to encourage you to help with a special project that launchs soon. We’ve talked in other places about the importance of designing and executing a year end giving campaign. Over the years we’ve been attempting to help churches add it to their funding flywheel, in order to increase the generosity of their people and we’ve seen a 10-15% increase in giving in several churches. Here are a few examples of resources, which are designed to help your church raise additional resources in the last 45 days of the year: 8 Phases of Effective Christmas Giving Campaigns 6 Important Reasons to Work on Your Church’s Christmas Generosity Campaign in the Summer 60-page Digital Magazine on Generosity If you haven’t planned a full year end giving campaign – you’re probably too late. But there is one tactic you need to plan now. Effective year end giving campaigns needs to be thoughtfully planned out and elegantly executed. If you don’t have one planned out at this point and you attempt to rush it you would be risking doing damage to your donor relationships. But don’t worry there is one tactic you could still pull together and see it encourage more generosity as we approach the end of the year. 10% of all charitable donations will be given during the last 48 hours of the year. That’s $625 million an hour for the last two days of December. A total of $30,000,000,000 in such a short period of time. [ref] Send an email to all of your people during the last 48 hours of the year, asking them to invest in the mission of your church. That’s the tactic. Sending an email to your church community, in the last two days of the year, will encourage your people to give to the good things that are happening at your church. It also reminds people, when they are thinking about their last-minute giving, of the amazing ministry your church has performed and inspires them to be included in the plans. 3 Reasons People Wait Until the Last 48 Hours of The Year to Give Taxes // Clearly, people wait until this time of year because they are reminded of the fact that gifts given at this time of year can be written down against their income tax. Businesses // Related to taxes, many business owners need to wait until the end of the year to observe how their businesses performed financially so they can plan their giving in such a manner that it...

read more