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Innovative Approaches to Facilities & Finances with Jamey Stuart

Posted by on Feb 22, 2018 in podcast, strategy | 0 comments

Innovative Approaches to Facilities & Finances with Jamey Stuart

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | MoreWelcome back to another episode of the unSeminary podcast! Thanks for joining us for our chat today with Jamey Stuart from Believers Church in Suffolk, Virginia. Believers Church is an active church with a unique story surrounding their building. The church is full of energy with an average age of 35 and lots of young families. Being in a military town, the congregation is very diverse and constantly changing. Today we’re speaking with Jamey about how they handled facility issues as they grew. Multi-site isn’t always the answer. // Growth always brings challenges, regardless of whether it is explosive, or slow and steady like Believers Church has experienced over the years. When Jamey first became senior pastor, Believers Church was in the process of turning a gymnasium-type building into a new sanctuary and converting the old sanctuary into the new kids’ space. They were reconfiguring their space constantly, moving offices around and freeing up more space for kids ministry. As soon as they freed up space it got filled. However, Jamey and his team felt the solution to their facility space issues wasn’t multi-site. Instead Believers decided to seek a bigger and better space while putting their existing space up for sale. Campaign on an idea. // Jamey wasn’t sure exactly what their next step was, but he felt very strongly that they needed to be prepared for whatever God put in front of them. The problem was, they didn’t have cash on hand to be able to move when that opportunity came. So they did a capital campaign simply based on the idea that they needed a bigger and better space. They didn’t have a drawing or a map or anything picked out; they only had an idea of a bigger space. Yet from this idea, they raised over one million dollars in two years. Casting a compelling vision for why you’re doing what you’re doing is key to inviting that investment and commitment from your community. Be open to new ideas. // During this time, the staff at Believers attended a free lunch seminar at Building God’s Way to explore ideas for the design of their new church. The old church property was still for sale, but it wasn’t too soon to start thinking about ideas for what they wanted in the new building and where God might be leading them. During the Building God’s Way seminar, they were challenged to consider constructing a space to be used not just for multiple church events, but rather a host of events within their community. The idea of constructing an event center immediately clicked with Believers Church and they began to dream about the possibilities in Suffolk. Eventually they bought land and began a building project for the Hub 757 event center, which the church uses on weekends for their services. Serve your community. // Jamey says Believers Church now sees themselves as a portable church with a permanent location. As a result, they don’t have expectations of accessing the space whenever they want because they share it with many other organizations and businesses who rent the space during the week. Believers does not use any church money to pay for event center costs. Rather the event center is a separate...

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4 Old School Communication Tactics Your Church Should Still Be Using Today

Posted by on Feb 21, 2018 in communications | 2 comments

4 Old School Communication Tactics Your Church Should Still Be Using Today

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | MoreIs your church leveraging chatbots to reach people? Are you leveraging a social media listening tool to understand the sentiment towards your church? What’s your Instagram story strategy to engage people in your community? Is your church ready for augmented reality and the impact that will have people attending your services? STOP! Too many church leaders are running too quickly to optimize the latest communication tools to reach people in their community while they are ignoring “low hanging” fruit with “old school” technologies with proven abilities to do the same. Before your church figures out the latest tool or trend, you need to make sure that you are leveraging existing channels. In January, Facebook announced its latest changes to the news feed which means organizations like ours are going to see even less “organic” reach on that channel. In fact, many brands are reporting a 50% drop in traffic from the social media behemoth in just a matter of weeks. [ref] This underlines that no church communications strategy can be single source dependent but needs to employ a wide variety of channels to reach your people and your community. 3 Reasons Church Leaders Are Drawn to the Latest Communication Technologies Shiny Object Syndrome // Too many of us are drawn towards the “latest” thing because it’s the latest thing. We hear some tech blogger talk about the latest whiz-bang service and we’re convinced that will solve our communication issues. The act of jumping from one shiny object to the next means that we don’t take time to dig deep and optimize any given channel. FREE is in our Budget // Most of us are trying to figure out how to reach more people with little or no financial investment. Lots of digital marketing solutions start out using “free” as a marketing tactic to get businesses using their platforms, and we’re drawn to that pricing! Over time, these platforms end up charging for what they were giving away, which means, we need to move on. We’re Aware Consumers // Lots of church leaders I know are actively engaged in the world around us. We spend time not just floating through life but are curious individuals. This is a great way to be! We see other organizations and businesses communicating with their communities and wonder what would happen if we applied those lessons to what we do in our church. In the end, we can be left bolting on one new strategy after another and ignoring legacy approaches that are still highly effective. Your Church Should Be Sending More Emails The industry’s average open rates for email for churches is 25.62%, and average rate that people will click on links in those emails is almost 8%. In fact, in a recent study it was found that as an industry, religious organizations have the highest open rates among dozens of tested industries. [ref] In a world where less than 1 in 100 people will see a post on Facebook that your church publishes, the fact that 1 in 4 people will open an email you send them starts to seem like a great opportunity! Most of us have a love/hate relationship with email. In fact, if we’re honest most days we...

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Big Data, Ministry Analytics & Your Church with Matt Engel

Posted by on Feb 15, 2018 in podcast, strategy | 0 comments

Big Data, Ministry Analytics & Your Church with Matt Engel

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | MoreThank you so much for joining us for another great episode of the unSeminary podcast. I’m thrilled to be speaking with Matt Engel, a research fellow at Leadership Network and also works at Gloo, a technology company. Our talk today is all about data intelligence. So what is data intelligence? We as ministry leaders are taught to steward well and have great intentions when it comes to measuring data. But we tend to measure the three B’s: butts, budgets, and baptisms, rather than measuring how people are engaging with our church. So how do we get better about the type of data we collect and how we are using it? Analyzing and quantifying data. // Matt realized that every week in his church the staff prayed for requests that came in, but no one could identify what they specifically prayed about in a quantitative way. So he and his staff team began to analyze the prayer requests that were submitted during a three-month period to see what people were concerned about. These requests were then divided into specific categories, and it allowed Matt and his team to see that the top prayer request was for marriage while the second was for health. They then repeated this exercise during another three-month period, from January to March, with the same process and measurements. The staff was surprised to see that the top prayer requests had changed. During that time most prayer requests were for finances. After doing some research, the staff also discovered that February, in their state, was one the highest months for divorce filings. So between analyzing prayer requests and doing research in the larger community, the staff was able to identify the top two concerns of their people with regards to relational health during this time were sex and finances. Act on results. // With this new information, Matt developed a plan to preach on stewardship and generosity in November, before the financial pressures of the holidays. When you want to get actionable insights, you need to develop a culture that is responsive to the results. Matt’s church wanted everyone to know that the reason finances were being addressed in November is because of the studies they did in the first quarter of the year. As a result, attendance grew and continued into the next year, plus they saw an improvement in people’s finances and a drop in requests for help in this area. Matt found when people in the church knew the results of surveys and understood what the church would do about them, it encouraged the people who didn’t respond to get their voices heard, and led the congregation into a path of action. When gathering data, explain why you’re doing it, share what you learn, and what your response will be to the results. Know and match. // At the end of the day if we’re going to be accountable to our people, we need to know them well. There’s a core process Matt talks about: connect, know, match, catalyze. First we connect with people and then we get to know them a bit. Next we need to match them with their next step according to what they need and catalyze them into whatever...

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5 Practical Systems to Drive Growth at Your Church

Posted by on Feb 13, 2018 in communications, multisite, personal productivity, strategy | 2 comments

5 Practical Systems to Drive Growth at Your Church

Are you ready to see your church impact more people than you have ever before? Are you tired of church leadership books that are long on theory but short on practical help? Have you wanted to reach more people in your community but you weren’t sure where to start? Are you worried that your church isn’t reaching its full potential? Today, I’m releasing a new book called “Church Growth Flywheel: 5 Practical Systems To Drive Growth at Your Church” and it’s full of practical insights to help your church reach more people starting today! The “big idea” of this book is that prevailing churches have five “systems” that they leverage to see their church’s growth. Each of these systems help the church encourage their people to invite friends and ultimately grow. Your church grows because people at your church tell their friends about the church. However, we know from studies that only 2% of people who attend church have invited a friend to join them in the last year. [ref] Core to the “Church Growth Flywheel” are a series of strategies to encourage your people to start talking about your church. Below is a broad overview of the 5 systems that we talk about in the book. For each system we deep dive and provide: Background information to understand why this is an effective church growth strategy to put into action right away. Step by step “getting started” instructions that you and your leadership team can start adding to your church right away. Real life examples from multiple growing churches who are leveraging this as a part of their growth strategy. Each system discussion ends with “rapid action steps” designed to move you from simply thinking about the topic to making an effort to apply these lessons to your church. Big Days are a Big Deal Don’t worry; I’m not going to ask you to have live camels at your Christmas Eve services or to have a robotic Jesus that goes up into the ceiling of your church at Easter. I am going to push you to think about how you can make those services, and a few others during the year, the kind of service which your people would want to invite their friends to witness, and moreover, which their friends will actually attend. In this section, we’re going to talk about the three or four Sundays which happen at your church every year, and which are critical for the long-term growth of your community. You know those Sundays: the mornings when your people are more inclined towards inviting their friends to come to a service (and their friends are more than willing to attend). We need to ensure that we’re crafting experiences on those big days that are set up to encourage invitation, especially to those who may have never attended the church before. You’ll learn about how early on in my career, I held convictions and led in a way that, in hindsight, actually hindered our ability to reach out to the people with the message of Jesus. We’re also going to talk about how churches get visitors from these Big Days to return for all the other days, because you might be able to drive in a big audience on Christmas and Easter, but how...

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Shawn Hennessy Offers Personal Reflections on Seeing A Church Grow from 167 to 3,000 in 5 Years!

Posted by on Feb 8, 2018 in personal productivity, podcast, strategy | 0 comments

Shawn Hennessy Offers Personal Reflections on Seeing A Church Grow from 167 to 3,000 in 5 Years!

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | MoreWelcome back to the unSeminary podcast and thanks so much for joining with us today. We have Pastor Shawn Hennessy with us from Life Church in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Today Shawn is sharing with us about his experience with burnout, and how that helped shape the way he sets priorities in his life – especially important when one leads a fast-growing church with constant demands. Seek your priorities. // Burnout is a real issue pastors need to be ready to face in today’s world, regardless of the church size. But when you add fast growth to the already demanding needs of a ministry, it can shut you down if you’re not orienting your life around the right things. As Shawn shares, it’s natural to get tired. For a while Shawn was seen as “the fixer” before he began to pastor Life Church in Green Bay. He was a young guy and sent places around the country to “fix” ministries. Shawn also had a rigorous speaking schedule and traveled continuously for about five years. Meanwhile, his wife was a youth pastor, and so they often found themselves in different places. Those early years were tough – being on the road meant Shawn barely got to know his kids when they were infants; he was away from home for their milestones, and eventually things imploded. All the accumulated pressure and stress led to a huge burnout in which Shawn’s credentials were taken away. He spent a year at home, taking a break from ministry, but that time was crucial for helping him reevaluate his life. Shawn shares, “What I learned in that year off was how to love my wife, how to love my kids and I learned how to love Jesus. I tried to leave ministry, but ministry wouldn’t leave me, so when I got the opportunity to get back in, I determined this time I’m just going to have priorities.” He spent six months praying and seeking God’s voice on what should be his top 5 priorities. Jesus is number one. // Shawn’s hitting rock bottom and taking a break from ministry provided the time Shawn needed to really cultivate a deep relationship with God. At this point, Shawn can honestly say Jesus is his top priority. We’re all supposed to say that, but ask yourself honestly, is He really your top priority? This doesn’t mean making church your top priority, but making Jesus Himself your top priority. Truly seeking His face and listening for what God was saying to him helped Shawn put Jesus as his top priority above everything else. Prioritize yourself above others. // As Christians, we think it may sound selfish and shocking to say it, but Shawn has learned that if he doesn’t prioritize himself, then everything else in his life will suffer. You might think you sound self-centered if you say this, but if you get into the mix of life and aren’t taking care of your body, mind, and spirit, there will be consequences. We have to pay attention to our health in all these areas and what we are feeding our bodies, minds and spirits. Love your spouse above your kids. // We are blessed with our kids, but we...

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5 Ways Crappy Internal Church Communications Can Slow Down Your Church’s Growth

Posted by on Feb 6, 2018 in communications, strategy | 2 comments

5 Ways Crappy Internal Church Communications Can Slow Down Your Church’s Growth

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | More“The art of communication is the language of leadership.” – James Humes How can I make this clear? If your church is crappy at communicating, you won’t grow! In fact, communication is at the core of how your church will (or will not) grow. The art and science of ensuring that the right message gets to the right people at the right time is at the core of seeing your church impact more people. You can’t just “wing” this aspect of your leadership; in fact, communication is your leadership. It’s core to what you “do” in the church. Here are 5 ways that poor communication might be holding back your church … Fuzzy Focus Leads to Vision Drift “You or I could deliver a mind-blowing, God-honoring, pulse-quickening vision talk on Sunday that leaves everyone revved up to go change the world, but by Tuesday, many people have forgotten they were even in church the previous weekend. Unbelievable, huh? Vision leaks.” – Bill Hybels, Founding Pastor, Willow Creek Community Church Over time if your church doesn’t consistently keep its vision in front of people, the reason for your existence will become fuzzy. If your people aren’t clear why your church exists they will just fill in the “vision blanks” and assume the church is about them. The church is the only organization in the world whose total existence is for the people outside of it! If you don’t remind the people time and again that the reason your church exists is to reach out to other people with the timeless message of Jesus, the church will drift into ineffectiveness. 4 Signs Vision is Leaking at Your Church Below are some sure signs that vision is leaking at your church. Do you see one of these happening at your church? If yes, then you would need to clarify the church’s vision to the people. If you’re experiencing all four of these, it’s time to articulate the vision in a massive and repeated way at your church! Petty Infighting // Are people worried about the color of the carpet at your church? (Or some other really petty stuff?) We tend to make mountains out of molehills when it’s not clear what we’re called to as a church. Everyone Agrees With You // I once had a mentor who told me that if 10% of the church isn’t upset with something you’re doing, you’re probably not taking new ground. I think that sentiment is accurate! It Seems Boring // We are engaged in a massive human drama, the outcome of which is literally global in scale. If you’re not picking up on some of that excitement, then vision is leaking. Fiefdoms & Sideways Energy // Are there leaders in your community that seem to divert people to a vision that is not quite aligned? Are there aspects of your ministry that are pulling away from the overall direction of the church? Fewer Volunteers = Fewer Inviters The more people that volunteer at your church, the larger your church will grow. A growth in volunteer engagement seems to precede attendance growth. This makes sense because the level of vision casting that is required to move someone from not volunteering to being a fully...

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Benny Ferguson on the Balance of Culture & Systems in Growing Churches

Posted by on Feb 1, 2018 in podcast, strategy | 0 comments

Benny Ferguson on the Balance of Culture & Systems in Growing Churches

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | MoreWelcome back to another episode of the unSeminary podcast. We’re happy to have you here with us today as we talk with Benny Ferguson, the executive pastor of LifePoint Church in Clarksville, Tennessee. Benny is with us today to talk about how LifePoint has developed its culture and systems in order to build a healthy, growing church. The culture and system “zipper”. // Most evangelical Christian churches have the same mission, vision and purpose. What separates your church from others around the country is a healthy culture and healthy systems. Culture is all about: how do people feel?, while systems are: how do people move? Benny thinks of these two aspects of ministry as two sides of a zipper that come together, working hand-in-hand. God is both creative and orderly – in scripture we see there was a culture around Jesus and how He made people feel, and a system of how to move: “Come, follow me.” How your church feels determines if people will come to your church in the first place, and how you move the people who come determines if they will stay and get plugged in. Both are measures of church health. Comfortable and connected. // When we prepare for guests at home we tidy things up, create a welcoming environment and even make things smell nice. LifePoint does the same within their church to make people feel at home and comfortable. Hospitality is a big deal. Your preaching should also make people feel welcome as well as encouraged. Worship should make them feel connected to God. Is there a culture of connection and belonging within your church? Even on your social media, examine what emotions it communicates and how it makes people feel when they check out your church. Does social media show other human faces, or are they images of a building and other things that might cause disconnect? Take it slow. // Newcomers to your church can feel overwhelmed by all the activity and how to grow on their faith journey. LifePoint is intentional about directing everyone through Growth Track to take their one, simple next step. A system around moving people is important because without it people will feel disconnected and you’ll lose them. But throwing too much at them at once can cause you to lose them as well. Go deeper. // Within Growth Track the purpose is to get people serving on a team and attending a life group. But at LifePoint they want people to go even deeper. They are currently kicking around the idea of doing something similar to Rooted, by the Mariners Church in California, which is a ten-week discipleship process that helps people go deeper in their faith for the purpose of personal transformation. You can learn more about LifePoint Church at their website www.lifepointchurch.tv or email Benny at benny@lifepointchurch.tv. Thank You for Tuning In! There are a lot of podcasts you could be tuning into today, but you chose unSeminary, and I’m grateful for that. If you enjoyed today’s show, please share it by using the social media buttons you see at the left hand side of this page. Also, kindly consider taking the 60-seconds it takes to leave an honest review and rating for the podcast on iTunes, they’re extremely helpful when...

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Have You Noticed This Subtle Trend in the Fastest Growing Churches in the Country?

Posted by on Jan 30, 2018 in communications, strategy | 2 comments

Have You Noticed This Subtle Trend in the Fastest Growing Churches in the Country?

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | MoreChurch leaders who are wanting to make a difference in their communities are always studying what is happening at prevailing churches. I’m sure you’ve taken time to learn from the church across town that is trying some new stuff and seeing what you can apply to your church. At unSeminary, a huge part of the reason we host the podcast every week is to expose you to church leaders from growing churches. In fact, we’ve focused on the fastest growing churches in the country because we want your church to grow more. 94% of the churches in the country are losing ground against the growth of the communities they serve. [ref] We’ve taken a keen interest in the 6% of churches that are bucking this trend and we spend a lot of time and energy talking with you about what they do because we want all of our churches to learn from them. Over the last 10 years, I’ve noticed a subtle trend in the fastest growing churches in the country. These churches mobilize their people to get out of their seats and serve on the streets of the community. Prevailing churches take the mass engagement of people towards acts of service in their community very seriously. More than just simply “social justice”, these initiatives are getting high percentages of people directly involved in making a difference. Rather than just a fringe dynamic in a few churches, you can see this trend in all kinds of churches that are making a huge difference. In fact, recently I just flipped through a list of the fastest growing churches in the country and did a quick dive onto their websites to see if I could find this trend, and sure enough, it just kept coming up time and again; below are some examples of what I found: Examples of Fast Growing Churches Employing Mass Community Service Experiences Crossroads Church in Cincinnati hosts a large-scale Thanksgiving Food Drive. Just last year, they brought in enough food for over 60,000 Thanksgiving dinners. They’ve also taken on the churchwide responsibility of sponsoring over 6,000 children in a developing country. This church has been declared to be the fastest-growing church in America for two years in a row by Outreach Magazine, which shouldn’t come as a surprise when you see a church doing so many good things in the community. Red Rocks Church in Littleton, Colorado runs an event called Hope for the Holidays, which is essentially a gift drive and wrapping event. The church and the community wrap up and deliver thousands of gifts every year to various social service agencies in the community. The church also runs a prison ministry known as God Behind Bars in which the men of the church bring the hope of Jesus to the prisoners. The Traders Point Church in Indianapolis, Indiana runs a special needs prom where they annually help young adults who could never go to a prom to experience one. This particular prom requires three to four volunteers for every guest that comes; it literally requires more volunteers than the number of guests in order to run smoothly. That night, you get an opportunity to see the last become the first. (Plus, it looks...

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Jimmy Scroggins on Keeping the Message Core in a Fast Growing Multisite Church

Posted by on Jan 25, 2018 in communications, podcast, strategy | 0 comments

Jimmy Scroggins on Keeping the Message Core in a Fast Growing Multisite Church

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | MoreThanks so much for joining us for another episode of the unSeminary podcast. We have Jimmy Scroggins from Family Church in West Palm Beach, Florida. Jimmy is with us today to talk about growing a church in a changing culture, while staying focused on the unchanging Gospel message. Encourage change without changing beliefs. // Our culture is quickly moving away from traditional Christianity and there are churches that have stepped away from the Gospel message in order to grow. But Family Church holds firmly to conservative doctrines and the Gospel message while still being one of the fastest growing churches in the country. Jimmy explains, “We haven’t changed our theology, we haven’t changed our network affiliations, we haven’t changed our historic roots, but we’ve changed our tone.” He believes that in today’s culture having a more direct approach to the Gospel is necessary because Christianity has thrived throughout the centuries as more of a subversive movement. While Family Church hasn’t changed their beliefs and what they preach, they have changed their tone in order to fully embrace the community in South Florida. Jimmy says this means being more culturally or racially inclusive, and speaking differently to people who disagree with them on cultural and theological issues. We are all sinners in need of repentance. // The most important thing to keep in mind is that no matter a person’s sexual orientation, race or belief system, we are all sinners in need of a Savior. Family Church is very open about this belief, and this is the conversation they have with people. As Jimmy says, it’s okay if you’re not okay, because none of us are okay: “We believe that Jesus is calling every sinner who will repent to Himself. So regardless what your lifestyle issue is, we’re inviting and calling and trying to persuade every sinner who will repent to come repent with us.” Family Church welcomes all, wanting no one to be made to feel outcast or inferior, because we are all sinners in need of a Savior. Diversity versus inclusion. // South Florida is a diverse and integrated environment, and the churches there should be reflecting that. But Jimmy says they need to move even beyond diversity to inclusion. Inclusion means that the diverse group of people in the room are now speaking into what is going on and are invited into leadership at the church. The Gospel is the great equalizer and as followers of Christ, we need to be willing to put ourselves in each other’s shoes and be willing to see the world differently. Gospel conversations are vital. // Jimmy estimates that there are about 5.5 million unchurched people in the South Florida Corridor. There’s no way all of those people can be reached simply by inviting them to church. “If you really want to move the needle on 5.5 million people, you’ve gotta have hundreds of thousands of Christians from thousands of churches having millions of Gospel conversations every day,” Jimmy says. Through a variety of resources, including a book written by Jimmy, Steve Wright and Leslee Bennett, titled Turning Everyday Conversations into Gospel Conversations, Family Church is focusing on training their people to have Gospel conversations. In their book they talk about ways to naturally have...

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10 Churches (You May Not Have Heard Of) to Follow for Social Media Inspiration

Posted by on Jan 23, 2018 in communications | 0 comments

10 Churches (You May Not Have Heard Of) to Follow for Social Media Inspiration

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | MorePrevailing churches are investing time, energy and finances into leveraging social media to drive engagement and weekend attendance. Gone are the days when a Facebook page or Instagram profile was a “nice to have” for ministries. Using these channels are now as important as having a sign on the front of your building or even where your building is located in town. Church leaders are required to closely study what others are doing and apply those lessons to their ministries. Two Type of Social Media Posts by Churches As you evaluate other churches’ social media content, you can observe that there are, in fact, two broad categories that help in understanding what they are doing to gain traction. (This actually applies to all social media content, not just churches’!) All great social media can be understood as one of these two types of content as the organization attempts to attract people to share the content with others. Remarkable // Remember when Oreo encouraged you to “dunk the dark” during the Super Bowl or all those great carpool karaoke videos or basically anything by the Bad Lip Reading guys? Such content is designed to create an interest in you to talk about it. It’s remark worthy … remarkable. Such type of content is hard to predictably produce but when it’s done well, it has the opportunity to spread far and wide. Helpful // Content that is designed to help you solve problems is another form of social media, which spreads far and wide. On social networks, the most helpful people win in the end. Examples of this content are those “top down” cooking videos or helpful blog posts or in fact anything that attempts to break down problems into bite-size solution chunks. While remarkable content is amazing when it goes “viral”, helpful content is scalable and can provide a predictable way to build influence online. As you evaluate the following leading churches’ social media accounts, notice these two different types of content that they produce. Think about how you could follow their lead and produce similar content for your church. Leading Churches on Social Media Real Life // Clermont, Florida Check out this church’s Facebook feed. Too many churches fall into the habit of simply using Facebook as a place to notify “Church is happening this Sunday” but Real Life gives us a great sense of what’s happening in the life of their church through their feed. Also … their Instagram stories should be emulated by your church! The Meeting House // Toronto, Canada I love their YouTube series “Bruxy’s Big Bag of Questions”! This is a perfect illustration of providing helpful content that spreads over time. When I viewed this, they had close to 100 videos on a wide variety of topics. Road to Life Church // Northwest Indiana This church has exploded out of the gates since it launched five years ago. Last fall, I was in a conversation with Pastor Dave from Road to Life where he described the phenomenal growth his church had witnessed and credited Facebook as core to their strategy. Follow along and learn from a church converting social browsers into committed followers of Jesus! Forefront Church // Virginia Beach, Virginia If you...

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