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5 Bad Habits Killing the Effectiveness of Your Church’s Announcements

Posted by on Oct 17, 2017 in communications | 0 comments

5 Bad Habits Killing the Effectiveness of Your Church’s Announcements

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | MoreThere are five precious minutes in your service that are solely intended to move people to action. The announcement time in your church service is a high leverage opportunity to encourage your people to move from where they are to where you want them to be. It really is the quintessential leadership moment during the service. However, it’s usually under-planned and under-leveraged in most churches. You’re missing out on the opportunity to make sustained progress in your church simply because you’re not leveraging those critical five minutes in your service. Over time, bad habits creep in and loom large on this aspect of your services that neutralize the efficacy of announcements. These habits reduce this part of the service – from potentially maximizing an incredible opportunity of getting people plugged into your church’s mission to an incredible waste of time. If your church can eliminate these 5 unhealthy habits from its system, the impact of your announcements will soar exponentially! You’re Talking About the Weather … way too much! All communicators know what you need in order to build rapport with your audience. You’re looking for quick ways to make a strong connection with the crowd that’s in front of you. Chances are that everyone has experienced the same weather that you did on the way in, so you quickly make some random comment about the sunshine or the rain – or whatever else you’ve just experienced. Stop it … it’s lazy. Unless there’s something truly remarkable about the weather, like a history creating storm, talking about the weather is just verbal diarrhea and besmirches the effectiveness of your announcements. It’s loose, excessive and doesn’t help anyone. People know what the weather is like, and what you are experiencing most days is pretty much what they’ve experienced the day before. It’s really not something your audience connects with you over. It’s like saying: Wow! Isn’t there a lot of oxygen in this air today? How many people are thankful that the sun came up today? Hey friends, hasn’t all this gravity been weighing us down lately! While the urge to talk about the weather comes from a good place, you instinctively go there because you somehow feel the need to break the ice with your audience. By all means, do attempt to build a bridge with your audience, but resist the temptation of stating the obvious. Here are a few more effective ways to make an emotional connection with your audience: Eye Contact // Studies have proven time and again that the best way to effectively engage with an audience is when the speaker actually looks people in the eye. Slow down and actually notice people! Stories // Our minds are hardwired to lean in and listen to a good story, so you might as well use that to your advantage. Draw your audience in by weaving your announcements through a narrative arc to come across as someone they can relate to. As you do that, your people can’t help but listen! Humor // I know being funny is hard. It takes insight and perfect timing to deliver a joke well and not come off as a hack. Hone this skill over time and it will surely draw...

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Josh Whitehead on Portable Instead of Permanent for Your Next Campus

Posted by on Oct 12, 2017 in multisite, podcast, strategy | 0 comments

Josh Whitehead on Portable Instead of Permanent for Your Next Campus

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | MoreWelcome, everyone, to this week’s edition of the unSeminary podcast. I’m happy to have Dr. Josh Whitehead with us today. He’s the executive pastor of Faith Promise Church. Faith Promise Church is a vibrant church in Tennessee with a really relevant message and worship experience. Today the church has eight locations and an average attendance of 7500 people, as well as an online presence. While most of Faith Promise’s campuses are in permanent locations, their most recent one is portable. Josh talks with us today about how Faith Promise made that decision and the way they approached a successful portable church location. Learn how to start off right. // Few churches in their Knoxville, TN area have survived being a portable location and so Faith Promise was hesitant to try it. Early on they had attempted campuses as portable locations, but ultimately made the decision to move them to a permanent sites. In these previous situations, Josh says that they began portability in the worst way by choosing a location that took hours to set up, or not having the right supplies and tools to set up efficiently. These experiences turned them off from seeking a portable location again for a long time. But when they considered the idea again, the staff at Faith Promise knew they had to find a way to make portability work. Finding permanent locations for each campus is an expensive business, so portability is well worth considering in spite of the challenges. So Faith Promise worked with Portable Church Industries to develop a solution in an area high school. Use demographics. // Faith Promise knew they had a community nearby where a lot of people had visited their church, but didn’t stay because of the distance. It was a prime area for a campus, but a permanent facility would be far too expensive in this area. So Faith Promise used a system called a Campus Launch Dashboard to evaluate what sites might be feasible for a new campus. In this form they fill out information and color code using red, yellow, or green based on where they are in each area. It identifies concerns such as available parking, space for kids’ ministry, and number of households in the area, as well as how many people have visited another campus from that community, but not stayed. As Josh notes, even driving 20 minutes to church is a stretch for people around rural Knoxville, so having a campus nearby is a big deal. You can download the Campus Launch Dashboard document for reference here. Make an investment. //Ultimately Faith Promise decided to reach out to a local high school in the area they were targeting. Early on, the principal and school staff were hesitant to allow the church to use their building. But the staff at Faith Promise worked to come alongside the school and truly foster a win-win relationship with the school. Though this high school was located in an affluent area, they were severely under-resourced. So Faith Promise made it clear that they wanted to invest in the school through the use of the location. Whenever the school had an assembly, they had needed to rent AV equipment, so one of the ways Faith Promise...

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Do These 5 Things Now to Give Your Christmas Services More Impact

Posted by on Oct 10, 2017 in communications, strategy | 0 comments

Do These 5 Things Now to Give Your Christmas Services More Impact

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | MoreChristmas is a really big deal at your church. It’s the time when we celebrate the birth of Jesus and it also represents some of the largest services you may host all the year long. From this vantage point, all these weeks away from the crunch time, we’ve pulled together 5 things to do, in order to give your Christmas Services more impact than ever before. Typically, these services represent your best time of year to reach people who usually don’t attend any church. Here are just a few ways to ensure that these services have as much impact as they possibly can! Get Your Services Listed Online Don’t wait to get your Christmas Services listed online. There are websites that list local events that you need to ensure your services get on-board. It’s not the best idea to leave this to the last minute because the longer they are listed, the better chances they have of being seen by people. Also, the longer they are listed, the search engines accord them more authority. A few places to make sure your Christmas services get listed on are: Your Own Website // Start by ensuring your church website has a page with all the required information about your Christmas services listed on it. Link back to this page from across the web when you list the services on other event sites. Facebook Events // Two billion people use Facebook every day and all of those users are no more than 3.57 connections away from each other. [ref] Although you might not be an active user of the Events tool on Facebook, the audience is just so large that you need to make sure you’re listed here, to promote your services! Hyper-Local Sites // Undoubtedly your community will have a site focused on local school board politics or talk about potholes on the main street. These hyperlocal sites typically have an events section looking for content to fill in. Patch is the leader in this space with over 900 active local sites. Nevertheless, browse through and you might see someone else offering this service too. Government Sites // Check your town and country websites because they often provide event listings about what’s happening in your community. These services are seen as encouraging local businesses and can offer a great source of community connections! Google, It // Finally, drop by Google and just enter your city name and “local event listings” and you’ll find more places to get your services listed. Buy Your Volunteers a Gift Serving at your Christmas services is a sacrifice. Typically, your volunteers are away from their family during this busy time of the year. In addition to it, these services are some of the busiest of the year, which means that they are stretched during these experiences. If you act now, you can get a gift for them at a relatively low cost, as a token of gratitude. Here are some ideas for a small gift for your Christmas volunteers: Custom Printed Christmas Ornaments from 4Imprint (same from Alibaba) M&Ms with your logo on them! Everybody loves a cool swag … a classic! Go the extra mile and “merchandise” your gifts to your volunteers in such...

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Mark Hearn on Transitioning a Monolithic Church to a Vibrant Multicultural Community

Posted by on Oct 5, 2017 in podcast, strategy | 0 comments

Mark Hearn on Transitioning a Monolithic Church to a Vibrant Multicultural Community

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | More Podcast (video): Play in new window | Download | EmbedSubscribe: Android | RSSThank you so much for joining us for this episode of the unSeminary podcast. I’m excited be speaking with Mark Hearn, pastor of First Baptist Duluth in Georgia. First Baptist Duluth really is a multi-cultural church. Currently it is composed of 42 different nationalities. There is music in different languages and people from all over the world worshipping together under one roof. When Mark first arrived at First Baptist in 2010, however, the church was the typical Anglo-Saxon monolithic church and not representative of the Duluth area. Duluth has quickly changed into a diverse and multi-cultural city, about 40 years ahead of the national average. First Baptist wanted their church to reflect the community where they were located, so they took on the task of changing the church’s culture in order to embrace a diverse congregation that reflected the diversity of the city. Mark is with us today to share what this process has looked like. Make crossing cultures a mission. // First Baptist is a very mission minded church, and so the first thing they decided to do was to be very intentional about their global missionary initiatives. They researched what were the largest unreached people groups locally, and they began to plant churches in those countries globally. Planting churches in these areas around the world allows for a unique opportunity for conversation with these people groups in your own city. You can share about your own travels to these countries, or mention that your church is sponsoring a church in their native area. Celebrate diversity. // The church began to look for ways they could celebrate alongside of the people from other nationalities. Mark explains that it’s the difference of ministry with versus ministry to. There are a lot of churches that do ministry to the people groups in their community, but don’t ask what could they do with the people. First Baptist Duluth began to recognize and celebrate special days, such as Indian Independence Day, East Asian New Year and Tres Reyes Magos (Three King’s Day), in its communities alongside the people of those cultures. These occasions allow the church members to celebrate together, learn more about the other cultures around them, and show deference and receptivity to other people groups. Use translators. // Language is the biggest barrier in crossing cultures, and so First Baptist wanted to do everything they could to eliminate that. As Mark notes, the local schools are made up of people from diverse groups and they are able to communicate across cultures, so how much more should the church do the same? First Baptist didn’t want different services in different languages meeting at different times, but rather everyone together in one place. One way they do that is by offering language bible study classes during the week, and then encouraging people to come together for weekly worship services in which they try to cross that language barrier. The weekend service offers headsets with live translation so the sermon can be experienced in one’s native language if needed. By hearing both the English sermon and their own language at the same time, it becomes a great tool for learning English. Don’t...

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7 Ways Smartphones Have Changed People at Your Church (And What to Do About it!)

Posted by on Oct 3, 2017 in communications, strategy | 0 comments

7 Ways Smartphones Have Changed People at Your Church (And What to Do About it!)

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | MoreDo you remember the world before the smartphones came and invaded all our spaces? I have a hard time recalling how we got along before these little rectangles of glass, metal and plastic lodged themselves firmly into our everyday lives. These devices have had simultaneously a profound and subtle impact on our people. Analogous to shifting sands under our feet, although the change is very minimal and hardly evident at the beginning but over time it becomes increasingly obvious. I’m not adopting a “technology is bad” point of view in this article. In fact, I’m not taking a “technology is good” point of view either. Rather than debate the value of the smartphone in our people’s lives I’m asking us to consider the impacts these instruments are already having today on our people and suggest ways in which our churches need to respond. Here are seven ways in which smartphones have already changed your people and what you can do about it. Hundreds of Friends Within Reach at a Moment’s Notice The development of smartphones has been equally matched with the rise of a rewiring of the very social fabric of humanity. I know that may sound overly dramatic but it’s simply the truth! We take for granted that people are able to instantly like, share and comment with their friends both near and far. This hyper-connectivity is redefining friendship and changing the way that we interact with people. One doesn’t need to search long for examples of how this new level of interconnected relationships have impacted the world around us. Remember the 2014 social craze “the ice bucket challenge”? Only made possible with the ubiquity of smartphones and pervasive social networks. In the end the challenge raised $220 million towards A.L.S. research that is continually making new discoveries! [ref] During the next natural disaster watch closely how the people on these social networks care for each other in amazing innovative ways. This was evidenced after Hurricane Irma decimated parts of Florida; it was heartwarming to see people turn to their phones to help others and offer comfort. [ref] Ultimately, when you combine smartphones and social networks together you have people more connected with the fringes of their social circles. Today we’re more aware of what is happening in the lives of people who we are loosely connected with compared to a generation ago. This is a great opportunity for your church because it’s these loose connections that drive the growth and development of your church. Here are some examples of how to leverage these opportunities for your church: Develop sharable social content … that people want to share! // Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snap Chat and other online social networks that might be developed in the future aren’t designed as another place for you to share announcements about your church. These networks are essentially driven by people sharing content that is humorous, intriguing and thought-provoking, so you need to release content which the people are encouraged to share online. The primary goal is to create sharable content while the secondary goal is to drive results for your church. Encourage your people to develop content. // The ice bucket challenge is the high water mark for seeing masses of...

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Daniel Im on Small Shifts That Will Transform Your Ministry

Posted by on Sep 28, 2017 in podcast, strategy | 2 comments

Daniel Im on Small Shifts That Will Transform Your Ministry

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | MoreHello there, and welcome to this week’s episode of the unSeminary podcast! I’m thrilled to have Daniel Im with us today from Lifeway Christian Resources. He is the founder/director of church multiplication for NewChurches.com, an author, and a teaching pastor at The Fellowship in Nashville. Lifeway offers church resources, from books and curriculum to other supplies used in church operations. In addition to that, Lifeway now resources church planting, church multisite and multiplication. Daniel works in that area of Lifeway with NewChurches.com. Today Daniel is with us to talk about his super practical new book, No Silver Bullets: Five Small Shifts That Will Transform Your Ministry, why he wrote it, and how it can help you in your own church. Do self-analysis. // It’s easy to go to a conference, read a book, see what another church slightly bigger than you is doing, and come back with advice on what to do. Often in the church world and leadership circles we tend to focus on what other churches are doing instead of discerning: WHY do I disciple the way I disciple, lead the way I lead, and teach the way I teach? You can’t import what works at another church and expect it to work at yours without doing self-analysis. In his book Daniel provides a number of self-assessment tools to help you understand the shifts he talks about. Making discipleship your goal. // We are taught in seminary to devote our time to studying and acquiring knowledge instead of serving and hands-on experience in a church. We spend so much time focusing on sermons, apologetics and knowing scripture that we don’t spend much time actually making disciples. Daniel’s book challenges: what if instead of making maturity our end goal, we made becoming a missionary our end goal? When acting as a missionary and making disciples who make disciples is your goal, maturity will be a byproduct. Normalize mission at your church. // Mission isn’t something that just the pastor should do. Making disciples who make disciples is the primary job of every follower of Christ, no matter what they do to earn a paycheck. It’s important to understand where you’re at and how you see the world, so you can integrate the shifts Daniel talks about in his book into a discipleship pathway for your church. Taking these steps will help to normalize living on mission at your church, which ultimately helps people live out the call to be disciple-making disciples. You can learn more about Daniel’s book at his website www.danielim.com. In addition, Lifeway has a Pipeline Conference for church leaders October 11-13. You can learn more at www.myleadershippipeline.com. Thank You for Tuning In! There are a lot of podcasts you could be tuning into today, but you chose unSeminary, and I’m grateful for that. If you enjoyed today’s show, please share it by using the social media buttons you see at the left hand side of this page. Also, kindly consider taking the 60-seconds it takes to leave an honest review and rating for the podcast on iTunes, they’re extremely helpful when it comes to the ranking of the show and you can bet that I read every single one of them personally! Lastly, don’t forget to subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, to get automatic updates every...

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5 Characteristics of Church Staff Teams that Break the 1,000 Barrier

Posted by on Sep 26, 2017 in communications, personal productivity, strategy | 3 comments

5 Characteristics of Church Staff Teams that Break the 1,000 Barrier

Only 2% of churches will ever see a weekend service attendance upward of 1,000 people. [ref] This particular growth barrier really is a gigantic challenge for church leaders, akin to low-oxygen at high-altitudes setting. Of all the challenges that present themselves to leaders who are looking to see their church break this barrier and go beyond- the leadership of the staff team might be among the most profound and complex. You could be asking yourself how you manage your team better, to witness your church break this barrier. Through my own personal experience over 20 years of ministry in helping three churches across the 1,000 barrier, over 200+ podcast interviews with churches who have broken this barrier and through my coaching practice of churches who are in the process of breaking this barrier, I have come across many diverse groups of staff teams. In my observations, I have attempted to condense the common traits of the teams who are able to break this barrier! Subject Matter Experts vs. Jack-Of-All-Trades Every staff member of churches that attempts to break the 1,000 barrier needs to instill a fundamental change of focus in their staff members. From being generalists to becoming much more specialized, is one of the toughest shifts of perspective that a staff member will face. It is difficult for long-term team members to identify their greatest field of contribution to the church, especially when they are used to doing so much. The “mindset shifts” that could help your team through this transition include: Only Do What Only You Can Do // Helping each team member get a clear picture of their greatest contributions to the mission and then freeing them up to “double down” on that area to help the church grow. Then release them from all other responsibilities. Got Us Here … Won’t Necessarily Get Us There // We all need to humbly hold onto our roles within the leadership of the church. We need to acknowledge that even though we led the church to this phase, we might not have what it takes to lead it through its next journey. Leader vs. Doer // Churches are often built on the back of great “doers”. However, in order to grow to the next level, your staff need to focus on leading people to the ministry rather than being the primary implementers. Hire Smarter People Than You // If you are the smartest person in the room … you’re in the wrong room! The future of the staff team lies in acquiring more qualified team members to shore up areas of the ministry where we anticipate growth. Leaders are Learners // Growing churches are led by growing leaders. A commitment to seeing the church grow means that as leaders, we are committed to constant growth in our personal, spiritual, emotional and leadership lives. Digging in your heels and refusing to grow disqualifies you from leading. Establishing “Middle Management” The average church in America has one full-time staff member for every eighty-seven attendees. [ref] That means a church of 1,000 people has about a dozen staff. There are studies about “span of control” that look at the optimal number of “direct reports” for any single staff member. However, all these studies conclude that between 5-15 is the maximum number of...

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Scott Kramer on Leading Through Profound Crisis in Your Church

Posted by on Sep 21, 2017 in communications, podcast, strategy | 0 comments

Scott Kramer on Leading Through Profound Crisis in Your Church

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | More Podcast (video): Play in new window | Download | EmbedSubscribe: Android | RSSHello, everyone, and thank you for joining us this week for another unSeminary podcast. I’m excited to have Scott Kramer with us today. Scott is the executive pastor at GT Church, which has two locations in Pennsylvania. GT Church is a 91 year old church with a very contemporary feel. They aim to make their message relevant to real life issues. The church went through a traumatic time two years ago when their lead pastor, Bryan, and his wife were hit head on in a collision with a drunk driver while riding their motorcycle. Bryan’s wife died instantly and Bryan was pinned under the vehicle for several hours. There were many uncertainties during this time, including whether Bryan would survive this terrible accident. But after several blood transfusions and the loss of his left leg, Bryan was released from the hospital. He stayed out of the leadership for a while until he was ready to step back into his role. Scott talks with us today about what a church might go through during a crisis like this, and how to keep the church moving forward with its mission without turmoil and confusion. Know your pastor’s heart. // When the staff first received the news of the accident, everything came to a screeching halt. There were so many questions about what the church should continue to do or not do during that uncertain time. A large Vacation Bible School outreach was coming up, a missions team was leaving for Uganda the following week, and other events needed to be reconsidered. But the staff at GT Church knew that Bryan would never have wanted any of their ministries to stop, even during a tragedy such as this. They knew his heart would tell them to keep reaching out and pursuing Christ’s call to the church. Recognize the importance of structure. // The leadership of an elder board and internal staff had been structured at GT Church long before this tragedy. Bryan had often told the staff that if something happened to him someday, someone else would have to take over and lead the church in its mission. The church was bigger than just Bryan or any of them individually, and that was the point he wanted to make sure everyone knew. Scott was named interim pastor while Bryan was recovering. By Bryan and the rest of the church leadership already having put a contingency structure into place, there was no scrambling to determine how things might continue, or finding someone who could lead the church. Having this structured board in place was a great gift in keeping the church’s leadership in place to guide the members during this time of tragedy. Ease into the path. // When Bryan had left the hospital and it was clear that he would return to his position in the church when he was able, Scott and other members of the church would stop by to visit. They gave him updates on what the church was doing. Diving immediately back into ministry right after leaving the hospital and dealing with the tragedy he had been through was too much for Bryan to...

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5 Simple Changes to Make Your Church More Unchurched Friendly

Posted by on Sep 19, 2017 in communications, strategy | 2 comments

5 Simple Changes to Make Your Church More Unchurched Friendly

You got into the ministry to reach people with the timeless message of Jesus. At some time in your journey, you’ve probably shed tears over the fact that there are people in your community who don’t follow him. You didn’t get in this to keep the people who are already “saved” but you feel called to seek people who need him deeply. You want to echo the story of the scripture that shows a loving God pursuing humanity. You want to reach unchurched people. But where do you begin? What are the simple things that each of us could do to make our churches more open to unchurched people? There are literally thousands of changes you could undertake, but here are five that I believe your church could implement in the coming months to make a huge difference: Double Down on Big Days There are a handful of days during the year that unchurched people are more likely to attend. Although they vary slightly from context to context, they include Christmas Eve, Easter, Mother’s Day, “First Sunday Back in the Fall”, and somewhere around the start of the calendar year. You and your leadership team needs to be placing an extra effort on these days to ensure that three things happen with extra intensity during these special days: Invite More People // Too many churches spend too much time worrying about what is happening during the service on these “big days” that they forget to focus their efforts on ensuring that their people invite their friends! You need to pull out all the stops to ensure that your people are going out of their way to bring their friends to this service. Unchurched people are more willing to attend on these days and so we need our people to take some efforts and invite their friends! Welcome Them Warmly // Again, so much time and effort is put into the special music or maybe the message on these days that leaders forget that most unchurched people have formed their opinions of your church long before they sit in their seat. Ensure your guest services’ team is on point and ready to greet people warmly (not creepily!) on these days. Take time to think through every step, from the moment they arrive at your location all the way through until they leave at the end of the day. Follow up & Invite Back // Finally, you’ve worked so hard to get them to come to your church, you’ve provided an incredibly engaging experience, and you had an amazing message mixed in there somewhere … but what next!? The momentum and weight of the service now needs to be pushed towards your guests coming back. Big days are all about earning a compliment in the mind of the guests to say “hmm, I’d try that again some time.” Don’t bombard them with a 1,000 messages and don’t talk about everything your church does. All you need to do is, three or four times during the big day invite them to come back next week… that’s it! Make Your Teaching More Visual Compelling teaching is at the core of every church that is reaching unchurched people. There is a lot of coaching that could be done to help your teaching connect more...

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Carey Nieuwhof & Jeff Brodie Give An Inside Look On A Succession Plan in Action

Posted by on Sep 14, 2017 in podcast, strategy | 0 comments

Carey Nieuwhof & Jeff Brodie Give An Inside Look On A Succession Plan in Action

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSS | MoreWelcome back to another episode of the unSeminary podcast. Thank you so much for joining us for today for a chat with Carey Nieuwhof and Jeff Brodie from Connexus Church. They hosted a conference called the Canadian Church Leaders Conference and I had a chance to interview them onstage. Carey was the founder at Connexus and worked as lead pastor, but they’ve had a transition in the last couple years in which Jeff is now lead pastor while Carey remains as founding pastor. I talk with them about what that succession process has been like. Pray and follow the call. // Initially Carey was the lead pastor and Jeff reported to him. Now Jeff is the lead pastor and Carey reports to him. In the summer of 2015, Carey felt that a change may be needed because his other pursuits were exploding. He spent some time praying about this and felt that Jeff would make a good lead pastor in his place. Jeff had never thought of himself as a lead pastor. Yet when Carey approached him with the idea, Jeff felt a stirring in his heart. He was excited about the mission of the church, but needed to know what it meant to lead the church. So Jeff spent some time praying about it and whether he might be the one to work in that lead pastor role. The mission has to be bigger than either of us. // One of the things that can ruin a shift like this is the idea of “Well, this is the way I used to do it.” Carey emphasized to the elders that Connexus should not be focused on preserving the past, but in moving forward to the changes that work with the future development of the church. Carey didn’t want Connexus Church to begin and end with him. For a church to be effective, people need to be willing and continue to change. Define your lanes. // In the first year of the shift, the change was through public access and private presence. So for example, in the public, it might not look like things had changed because Carey was there. But privately Carey took time away from staff and leadership meetings. That allowed all eyes to shift to Jeff among the staff. Later the shift was more visible publicly as Jeff began to step into Carey’s lead pastor role in the larger church community. Spend time outside of the church. // Carey and Jeff try to spend time with each other and on the phone together when it doesn’t focus on the church. They realized that the better they are with each other relationally, the better they are organizationally. Cracks between Carey and Jeff can cause cracks within the church as the staff sees these problems between them. You can learn more about Connexus at www.connexuschurch.com and more at about the Canadian Church Leaders Conference here. Thank You for Tuning In! There are a lot of podcasts you could be tuning into today, but you chose unSeminary, and I’m grateful for that. If you enjoyed today’s show, please share it by using the social media buttons you see at the left hand side of this page. Also, kindly consider taking the 60-seconds it takes...

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